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Sashiko and Rafoogari: Recycling, Repurposing and Mending

lizettegreco:

Repurposing and recycling are a big part of our work, finding ways to consume less materials and repurpose what is already available. I believe that recycling goes hand in hand with mending.

Mending is an ancient practice across many cultures used often during times of need across history.

I…

robertogreco:

Having spent several years transforming children’s drawings into plush sculptures and other art, we were ready to give these creations even deeper meaning. The result is an ongoing project called One and Only. The project is partly inspired by Phillipe Starck’s TeddyBearBand and an anecdote from Gretchen Ruben.

We’re working with children and/or their parents to help them create their own plush art. While the development of craft skills is important to the process, the project’s primary concern is a conversation about sustainability, slow living, relationships, and the beauty of imperfections and seams, both in the objects we cherish and in the people we love.

I’m reminded by a passage Ariel Kaminer wrote in a letter to David Rakoff, shortly before his death:


  Here is the simplest lesson you taught me: Don’t trade up.
  
  In terms of three-word volumes, it ranks right up there with “It gets better.” Like that more famous line, it starts out as a bit of simple, practical instruction — don’t back out of a social engagement just because a snazzier offer came along — and broadens out into an entire perspective on how to live. Don’t grade friendships on a hierarchical scale. Don’t value people based on some external indicator of status. Don’t take a competitive view of your social life. There are very few rules I carry around with me every day. Don’t trade up is one of them, and I truly can’t tell you how many seemingly complicated situations it resolved into clarity and fairness. I am grateful to you for that.


Children making their own plush companion, parents making one for their child, or older siblings making one for a younger sibling, One and Only comes with the suggestion that this will be their one-and-only plush toy. It’s theirs to keep, but hopefully they will also be willing to share their story and photographs of their creations, like the elephant above that nine-year-old  Margot made with us a few months ago.

robertogreco:

Having spent several years transforming children’s drawings into plush sculptures and other art, we were ready to give these creations even deeper meaning. The result is an ongoing project called One and Only. The project is partly inspired by Phillipe Starck’s TeddyBearBand and an anecdote from Gretchen Ruben.

We’re working with children and/or their parents to help them create their own plush art. While the development of craft skills is important to the process, the project’s primary concern is a conversation about sustainability, slow living, relationships, and the beauty of imperfections and seams, both in the objects we cherish and in the people we love.

I’m reminded by a passage Ariel Kaminer wrote in a letter to David Rakoff, shortly before his death:

Here is the simplest lesson you taught me: Don’t trade up.

In terms of three-word volumes, it ranks right up there with “It gets better.” Like that more famous line, it starts out as a bit of simple, practical instruction — don’t back out of a social engagement just because a snazzier offer came along — and broadens out into an entire perspective on how to live. Don’t grade friendships on a hierarchical scale. Don’t value people based on some external indicator of status. Don’t take a competitive view of your social life. There are very few rules I carry around with me every day. Don’t trade up is one of them, and I truly can’t tell you how many seemingly complicated situations it resolved into clarity and fairness. I am grateful to you for that.

Children making their own plush companion, parents making one for their child, or older siblings making one for a younger sibling, One and Only comes with the suggestion that this will be their one-and-only plush toy. It’s theirs to keep, but hopefully they will also be willing to share their story and photographs of their creations, like the elephant above that nine-year-old Margot made with us a few months ago.

thegoldensmith:

(via THE GOLDEN SMITH)
Foal Pendant- 18k Gold- David Neale

thegoldensmith:

(via THE GOLDEN SMITH)

Foal Pendant- 18k Gold- David Neale

(via thegoldensmith-deactivated20130)

Renilde de Peuter & Hermine Van Dijck

Renilde de Peuter & Hermine Van Dijck

1stpalmettoauxiliary:

Niiiccce.
bandannawanderings:

Sashiko and Patches - My legs

1stpalmettoauxiliary:

Niiiccce.

bandannawanderings:

Sashiko and Patches - My legs

(via lizettegreco)

Sashiko and Rafoogari: Recycling, Repurposing and Mending

lizettegreco:

Repurposing and recycling are a big part of our work, finding ways to consume less materials and repurpose what is already available. I believe that recycling goes hand in hand with mending.

Mending is an ancient practice across many cultures used often during times of need across history.

I…

(Source: thesewercat)

(Source: 66lanvin, via cocon-inp)

robertogreco:

Having spent several years transforming children’s drawings into plush sculptures and other art, we were ready to give these creations even deeper meaning. The result is an ongoing project called One and Only. The project is partly inspired by Phillipe Starck’s TeddyBearBand and an anecdote from Gretchen Ruben.

We’re working with children and/or their parents to help them create their own plush art. While the development of craft skills is important to the process, the project’s primary concern is a conversation about sustainability, slow living, relationships, and the beauty of imperfections and seams, both in the objects we cherish and in the people we love.

I’m reminded by a passage Ariel Kaminer wrote in a letter to David Rakoff, shortly before his death:


  Here is the simplest lesson you taught me: Don’t trade up.
  
  In terms of three-word volumes, it ranks right up there with “It gets better.” Like that more famous line, it starts out as a bit of simple, practical instruction — don’t back out of a social engagement just because a snazzier offer came along — and broadens out into an entire perspective on how to live. Don’t grade friendships on a hierarchical scale. Don’t value people based on some external indicator of status. Don’t take a competitive view of your social life. There are very few rules I carry around with me every day. Don’t trade up is one of them, and I truly can’t tell you how many seemingly complicated situations it resolved into clarity and fairness. I am grateful to you for that.


Children making their own plush companion, parents making one for their child, or older siblings making one for a younger sibling, One and Only comes with the suggestion that this will be their one-and-only plush toy. It’s theirs to keep, but hopefully they will also be willing to share their story and photographs of their creations, like the elephant above that nine-year-old  Margot made with us a few months ago.

robertogreco:

Having spent several years transforming children’s drawings into plush sculptures and other art, we were ready to give these creations even deeper meaning. The result is an ongoing project called One and Only. The project is partly inspired by Phillipe Starck’s TeddyBearBand and an anecdote from Gretchen Ruben.

We’re working with children and/or their parents to help them create their own plush art. While the development of craft skills is important to the process, the project’s primary concern is a conversation about sustainability, slow living, relationships, and the beauty of imperfections and seams, both in the objects we cherish and in the people we love.

I’m reminded by a passage Ariel Kaminer wrote in a letter to David Rakoff, shortly before his death:

Here is the simplest lesson you taught me: Don’t trade up.

In terms of three-word volumes, it ranks right up there with “It gets better.” Like that more famous line, it starts out as a bit of simple, practical instruction — don’t back out of a social engagement just because a snazzier offer came along — and broadens out into an entire perspective on how to live. Don’t grade friendships on a hierarchical scale. Don’t value people based on some external indicator of status. Don’t take a competitive view of your social life. There are very few rules I carry around with me every day. Don’t trade up is one of them, and I truly can’t tell you how many seemingly complicated situations it resolved into clarity and fairness. I am grateful to you for that.

Children making their own plush companion, parents making one for their child, or older siblings making one for a younger sibling, One and Only comes with the suggestion that this will be their one-and-only plush toy. It’s theirs to keep, but hopefully they will also be willing to share their story and photographs of their creations, like the elephant above that nine-year-old Margot made with us a few months ago.

thegoldensmith:

(via THE GOLDEN SMITH)
Foal Pendant- 18k Gold- David Neale

thegoldensmith:

(via THE GOLDEN SMITH)

Foal Pendant- 18k Gold- David Neale

(via thegoldensmith-deactivated20130)

Renilde de Peuter & Hermine Van Dijck

Renilde de Peuter & Hermine Van Dijck

(Source: azuo, via beautravailaime)

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ce que je vois. ce qui m'inspire. chez moi ou chez les autres.
what i see. what inspires me. mine or others. images are link.

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